Sentinels of the Deep: INS Karanj

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Senior Research Associate, Maritime History Society

The efficacy of submarines as a potent military machine was established during the Second World War. Since then, the advancement of these submersible combat vessels have earned them the sobriquet of ‘silent killers of the deep’. They are valued for their relative undetectability underwater and capability to sneak up and destroy a much stronger warships using lethal torpedoes or anti-ship missiles. This gives them the badge of being one of the best deterrents that any navy can possess. The Indian Navy inducted its first submarines in 1967, which were the Foxtrot-class submarines from the erstwhile Soviet Union. Today, the Indian Navy submarine arm has come a long way progressing towards indigenous construction and demonstrating India’s technological prowess. Continue reading “Sentinels of the Deep: INS Karanj”

Exercise Milan: A Brief Overview of the Multilateral Naval Exercise in the Indian Ocean Region

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Senior Research Associate, Maritime History Society

The Indian subcontinent has a vast history of flourishing maritime associations that predominantly involved commerce, culture and religion. However, the legacy of the erstwhile Indian mariners and seafarers who plied the oceans afar was gradually eclipsed by the lure of terrestrial possession until the last century. The liberalisation, privatisation and globalisation reforms in India in the ’90s can be regarded as a tipping point of enunciation of a change in the policy and national outlook towards our maritime frontiers. It rendered increased attention towards infrastructural development of Indian ports and its underlying coastal areas thereby placing the blueprint of maritime strategies on a national pedestal. This paradigm shift in our strategic outlook gained gradual prominence. Continue reading “Exercise Milan: A Brief Overview of the Multilateral Naval Exercise in the Indian Ocean Region”

International Education Day: Need To Bolster Maritime Studies In India

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Senior Research Associate, Maritime History Society

The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted a resolution on 03 Dec 18 that proclaimed January 24 as International Day of Education in recognition and celebration of the role of education that is instrumental in bringing global peace and sustainable development. This being the fourth year of the celebration, the theme of discussions at this pedestal is to highlight the transitions that have to be encouraged in the field of academia to build more sustainable, inclusive and peaceful futures. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated a pre-existing education crisis worldwide. So, the objective is to strengthen education as a public endeavour and deliberate how to steer digital transformation in the post-COVID era. This will endorse support for academicians and unlock the potential in every individual to contribute towards the collective well-being of humankind.

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Salt Politics: A Maritime Perspective

By Janhavi Vilas Lokegaonkar, Research Associate, Maritime History Society

Imagine a plate of delectable food in front of you that turns out to be an unpleasant experience on your palate due to inappropriate use or rather absence of salt! Even in our imagination, food without salt paints such a bland picture. That’s the power of salt. In the Indian independence struggle, salt had a significant role to play.

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The Need for Docks in Bombay in the Nineteenth Century

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Research Associate, Maritime History Society

As we study the history of Bombay, we realise how important it is to have an interdisciplinary approach. There are many reasons that have shaped the city that we see today. It is important to assess the importance of the role of maritime trade and economy in addition to the Indian and International political affairs that the city bears witness to.

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INCREDIBLE WINGS OF GOLD – An Obituary to Late Cdr Nishant Singh

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Research Associate, Maritime History Society

With each passing day, tensions are rife along the Indian borders and we have all our Armed Forces combat ready. Many soldiers have lost lives in battlegrounds and some have met their fate due to unfortunate mishaps. On a personal note, my association with MHS has not only brought me closer to the maritime domain from an academic and heritage point of view, but has also sensitised me in more capacities- one of them being an amplified awareness of the role and contribution of the defence forces that has further deepened my respect for every officer and soldier of all the military and paramilitary services.

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The Sassoon Dock Story

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Research Associate, Maritime History Society

Mumbai, the city fascinates many people and is rightly touted as the ‘City of Dreams’ or the ‘City that never Sleeps.’ As fascinating as the city is, equally interesting is its history. Formerly called Bombay, this city has been responsible for myriad changes in the society as it itself underwent a lot of transitions through time. Maritime enterprises have played a pivotal role in the making of this city. The cause and effect relation between the mercantile interests combined with maritime infrastructure transformed the city’s economy. While we Mumbaikars continue to disregard the importance of certain historical and heritage aspects that should be treasured, a certain microscopic aspect of erstwhile Bombay’s maritime history stood the testimony of time to tell its story. It continues to do so just by emitting the nauseating stench of the fish that affirms its presence to passers-by. Yes, it is the Sassoon Dock!

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OVERVIEW OF MUGHAL ADMIRALTY

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Research Associate, Maritime History Society

The Mughal rule in India witnessed tremendous power politics throughout their reign in the Indian subcontinent. The dynamism of the Mughal armies and their glories in war, statesmanship of various Emperors are very well documented. Their control over the mainland was possible due to their well-augmented militia. A lot is also written about it. What remains neglected is their Naval setup. Let us take a look at the Mughal Admiralty as it existed during the long reign of the Mughal emperors.

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Asserting the Importance of Maritime History and the Need for Maritime Perspectives in Indian Historical Narratives

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Research Associate, Maritime History Society

Maritime history is a broad, interdisciplinary theme while studying global history encompassing the multidimensional study of human interactions.  Arthur C. Clarke has captured the enormity of the maritime expanse as he has rightly put “How inappropriate to call this planet ‘Earth’, when it is clearly Ocean.”

Indians have been seafarers with a history of their maritime ventures that can be traced back to two to three millennia. There is substantial evidence to prove this. Indian Maritime History outlines the traditional themes developed around separate and isolated subjects like the history of maritime trade, ventures, of conquests, colonisation and culture, historical analysis, and discourse on naval warfare and on the economic affairs that encapsulates nautical traditions and practices that include (but are not limited to) shipbuilding, overseas trade, and commercial fishing.

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The Small Indian Wonder: Lakshadweep

By Janhavi Lokegaonkar, Research Associate, Maritime History Society

The tiny Union territory is making big news! Lakshadweep is the only territory under the Indian jurisdiction to be completely Covid-free even after five months since the first case was reported1 in India, in Kerala.

But the news should not come as surprise either because the islands stand out as unique entities. They have an inimitable ecosystem in terms of biodiversity, physical environment. India has about 1100 islands-inhabited and uninhabited. Lakshadweep, India’s smallest Union Territory, is an archipelago consisting of 36 islands well known for its exotic and sun-kissed beaches and lush green landscape. The name Lakshadweep means ‘a hundred thousand islands’ in Malayalam and Sanskrit.

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